Special Collections and Archives blog

February 22, 2017
by special collections & archives
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Sue Bennett Photographs now Digitized and Online!

It’s only a start, but Special Collections and Archives has digitized a wonderful selection of 38 photographs from the Sue Bennett Collection. Bennett (1948-2003) was a highly successful (regionally, nationally, and internationally renowned) commercial photographer in Flagstaff; SCA received her entire life’s work in 2013. Since then, SCA has made significant progress on describing the materials in a finding guide (see previous link) but until now has not displayed any of her work visually. The 38 selections SCA has made (thus far) come from Bennett’s self-described and separated ‘Super Super Selects.’ Below are a couple of examples. In the coming weeks SCA will be adding rich contextual descriptive metadata to these images in order to facilitate enhanced access to them. Stay tuned as we add more amazing images from Bennett’s collection to our digital archives!

Grand Canyon – Little Colorado River, 1986. NAU.PH.2013.16.6.3.2.48

Sheep in Italy, 1993. NAU.PH.2013.16.6.3.2.78.

February 15, 2017
by special collections & archives
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Internship Opportunity 2016-2017

Northern Arizona University
Cline Library
Archival Internship Announcement
2017-2018 Collier Internship

The Cline Library at Northern Arizona University invites applications for The Collier Internship.

The 2017-2018 Collier intern will inventory, digitize, and describe photographs (transparencies, negatives, prints, digital) created by physician and photographer Michael Collier. Collier has been photographing regionally, nationally, and internationally at significant locations since 1970 and has amassed a significant body of work that speaks to his passion and strengths as a photographer. Highlights include photographs of numerous national parks (such as Grand Canyon, Yellowstone, Grand Tetons, and Death Valley); geologic features (such as Alaska glaciers, California faults, and Mount St. Helens); and portraits of individuals.

Duties and Opportunities: The 2017-2018 Collier intern will work closely with Collier and Cline Library’s Special Collections and Archives (SCA) staff to assist in the preparations for the eventual transfer of Collier’s photographic legacy to SCA. Tasks will include inventorying physical collections (slides, negatives, and prints) in Microsoft Excel; digitizing and editing a selection of transparencies; and enhancing descriptive metadata (locations, subjects) using Library of Congress-approved authorities.

This internship offers the opportunity to gain practical experience in:

• Archival arrangement and description and the use of controlled vocabularies
• Contextual research and effective communication of Collier’s work to others
• Digitization and use of related hardware/software
• Photographic creation, editing, and organization
• Independent and collaborative projects

Most work will take place at Collier’s office in downtown Flagstaff, with periodic work at Cline Library. Transportation to Collier’s office is the responsibility of the intern.

The Collier intern will work 364 hours over the course of the academic year (or 36 weeks) and on average 10 hours/week. Hours can be flexible. The intern will earn $12/hour, paid bi-weekly through the academic year.

The internship is expected to begin early in the Fall 2017 semester. Depending on financial resources and/or project success during the first year, the internship may be extended an additional year.

Qualifications: Currently enrolled NAU students (undergraduate and graduate) are encouraged to apply. Candidates should have a demonstrated interest in photography, communications, geography, information science, or another related area.

Knowledge, Skills, Abilities Required:

• Strong ability to analyze visual data while employing advanced research skills
• High level of detail and organization
• Advanced communication skills (oral, written)
• Ability to work independently and as part of a team
• Basic experience with Microsoft Office products

Knowledge, Skills, Abilities Preferred:

• Demonstrated experience with digitization hardware and software
• Knowledge of Colorado Plateau and Southwest history
• Understanding of photographic and print making processes
• Familiarity with archival practice

Application Deadline: Open until filled or the end of the spring 2017 semester. To apply, submit the following documents to: Peter Runge, NAU Cline Library, Box 6022, Flagstaff, AZ 86011-6022 or email Peter.Runge@nau.edu:

• Résumé or vita
• Letter of application addressing your qualifications
• Copy of current transcript
• Names and contact information for three references

For more information, contact Peter Runge at peter.runge@nau.edu or (928) 523-6502.
The mission of Cline Library’s Special Collections and Archives Department is to collect, preserve, and make available archival materials that document the history and development of the Colorado Plateau. Interdisciplinary in nature, the collections include 7 million manuscripts, 1 million photographs, 35,000 books, 2,000 maps, and 1,300 oral histories. Learn more at http://archive.library.nau.edu.

NAU has a growing and diverse student population and is a committed Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution and Employer of National Service. All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply.

February 9, 2017
by special collections & archives
Comments Off on Victor H. Green’s Negro Travelers’ Green Book

Victor H. Green’s Negro Travelers’ Green Book

Green Books and Maps

Usually when I sit down at the keyboard to add a story to this blog, the story focuses upon a collection, or the status of an exhibit or it is something vaguely humorous (archival humor, that is). What I present today really falls into a whole other sort of set of categories. I’ll elaborate-

A few years back, we became re-acquainted with a title that in some ways was a relic of a happily lost past- Victor Green’s Negro Motorists’ Green Book (and the subsequent Negro Travelers’ Green Book) through some inquiries made by National Park Service researchers who were looking into the status of historic businesses along Route 66 here in Flagstaff.  The little guide books listed places in cities and towns all across America that would accommodate African American travelers. As Mr. Green stated:  “it has been our idea to give the Negro traveler information that will keep him from running into difficulties, embarrassments and to make his trips more enjoyable.” A very loaded statement given the timeframe in which the Green Book was published and used.

Given Special Collections and Archives’ interest in travel and tourism in the Colorado Plateau region, the Green Book then was a very particular lens through which we could view tourism within the region- and we wanted copies. Unfortunately beyond the very rare and expensive copy or two that slid through E-bay, none could be had at any price we could afford.

You can imagine the collective excitement when while searching for new books for our collection, I ran across a new reprint copy of the 1941 edition on Amazon, put out by About Comics. I decided to e-mail About Comics with a couple of questions- why did they elect to reprint the Green Book (and why 1941?), and could we expect more editions in reprint? My first discovery was that About Comics was really one man, Nat Gertler, and here was his response:

“I think the Green Book is a great thing to have available because its very existence tells a piece of the sad history of America. The fact that in a nation filled with places to stay and to get a meal, the African-American traveler needed to have this sort of list, of places that would accept their money which was as green as anyone else’s, speaks to the problem of the time. When you read a copy of the Green Book, you’re kind of hoping that it would be filled with explanations of why there are such limitations, what’s going on, and angry invective railing against the injustice, but when you see it with its simple listings, ads, and little articles, you realize that it is far fiercer indictment without those things. To expect this book to announce the injustice of it all is like expecting a fish to say “I was swimming, in the water.” The water doesn’t need to be mentioned. The water is everywhere, it is assumed. There was not a single person who bought the Green Book back in 1940 who didn’t know why it was needed; they were just glad to have it available.”

He continues:

“As to why About Comics, a company that as its name suggests specializes in books of comics and books about comics, is reprinting it: About Comics is a one-man operation, strictly small time and kept that way on purpose. If About Comics is doing anything, it’s me, Nat Gertler, doing it. When I publish something, it’s generally just because I find it interesting, and reckon that if I do, perhaps others will as well. Sometimes I’m wrong. When I first heard about the Green Book, I knew that I wanted to have a copy, and perhaps I was not the only one. This time, I was right.”

About more releases:

“The 1954 edition of the Green Book (by then, its name was changed to The Negro Travelers’ Green Book) should be available within a couple days. I picked that year because it was far enough from the first edition we reprinted, 1940, that the material would have evolved… and also that was the year of Brown v. Board of Education, which was of course a key point (if far from the final one) in curtailing the segregation of America. I may well continue to reprint various volumes if the market shows demand, although I think that for a lot of people simply having one will be enough. There were also similar travel guides for American Jews, and it would be good to bring one of those back in print. Beyond that, I really don’t have any long-term plans for anything. We’ll see where inspiration and suggestions (I’m always open to ideas) take me.”

So, come on by and see these two books that we now have in SCA, they are at the same time historic, and seemingly relevant once again. I will guarantee you’ll never look at travel in our nation quite the same way again.

Thanks, Nat for putting these books into our hands (and the hands of our researchers) again.

January 20, 2017
by special collections & archives
Comments Off on Snow, Snow, Snow…Let It Snow.

Snow, Snow, Snow…Let It Snow.

As the snow falls this weekend in Flagstaff, we wish you a safe and fun weekend.

 

Photograph_of_snowmobile_on_snow_storm_aftermath_in_Flagstaff_Arizona_December_19_1967

Image courtesy of the Fronske Collection, circa December 1967.

 

Flagstaff_is_Sliding_Skidding_Skiing_

Image courtesy of the NAU Cline Library, date unknown.

 

San_Francisco_Peaks_Skiing_Arizona_Snow_Bowl_near_Flagstaff_View_from_San_Francisco_Pks_3_Skiers_Caption_by_Josef_Muench

Image Courtesy of the Josef Muench Collection, circa 1960

January 17, 2017
by special collections & archives
Comments Off on Sue Bennett Collection Finding Guide Now Available

Sue Bennett Collection Finding Guide Now Available

Sue Bennett Coral Pink Sand Dunes, Utah John Running Photograph (NAU.PH.4.1.30.10.64)

Sue Bennett Coral Pink Sand Dunes, Utah
John Running Photograph (NAU.PH.4.1.30.10.64)

Special Collections and Archives is pleased to announce the creation and release of the Sue Bennett finding guide.

Sue Bennett was born in Pasadena, California in 1948. She received a Bachelor of Arts degree in History from the University of Southern California in 1972 then moved to Flagstaff, Arizona where she received her Bachelor of Science degree in 1975. While attending the Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff she enrolled in many photography classes where her photographs of athletes impressed local photographer John Running. She did an internship for Mountain Bell taking marketing photos and later worked for the Arizona Tourism Board. Around this time, she started a freelance photography business called Sue Bennett Photography Inc.

Bennett was a masterful business woman, marketing herself and her work. In her later career, she was sought after by top agencies to shoot ad campaigns for clients such as Dupont, Olympus, Nikon, IBM, American Express, and many others.

In May of 2003, Sue died tragically in a car accident near Palm Springs California. She was remembered by friends and colleagues not just for her remarkable photography, but as a fun loving, kind and generous person.

In 2013 John Running, Bennett’s long-time partner, donated her work to Cline Library Special Collections and Archives. Approximately 150,000 color slides, black-and-white negatives/prints, and prints form the bulk of the collection.  Detailed diaries and journals provide additional contextual insight into her work and personal life.

Special Collections and Archives will be developing an exhibit featuring Sue’s work that will open in October 2017. The department is receiving applications for the Elizabeth M and PT Reilly Summer Internship until February 17, 2017. The Reilly intern will be responsible for developing the physical and virtual exhibit under the supervision of an archivist. See the internship announcement here.

January 6, 2017
by special collections & archives
Comments Off on Freaky Friday-Celebrities at NAU

Freaky Friday-Celebrities at NAU

First up:

 A.S.C. La Questa Queen Patricia 'Skip' Johnson and Robert Mitchum. NAU.ARC.1948-6-11 (1948)

A.S.C. La Questa Queen Patricia ‘Skip’ Johnson and Robert Mitchum. NAU.ARC.1948-6-11 (1948)

Next:

Campus Visitor - Lucille Ball. Lucille Ball visits the campus primary laboratory school, 1961. NAU.ARC.1961-6-2

Campus Visitor – Lucille Ball. Lucille Ball visits the campus primary laboratory school, 1961. NAU.ARC.1961-6-2

Next:

La Questa Dance: Errol Flynn dances with Queen Alice Moore. 1940. NAU.ARC.1940-6-16

La Questa Dance: Errol Flynn dances with Queen Alice Moore. 1940. NAU.ARC.1940-6-16

December 16, 2016
by special collections & archives
Comments Off on Elizabeth M and P.T. Reilly Internship 2017

Elizabeth M and P.T. Reilly Internship 2017

The Cline Library at Northern Arizona University invites applications for The Elizabeth M. and P.T. Reilly Internship.

The 2017 Reilly intern will work closely with Cline Library’s Special Collections and Archives staff to develop physical and virtual exhibits focused on the life and photographic work of Flagstaff photographer Sue Bennett (1948-2003).  Bennett moved to Flagstaff in the mid-1970s because of her love of the Southwest and to attend NAU; she graduated in 1975 with a Bachelor of Science. She subsequently became a well-known and highly successful commercial photographer at the regional, national, and international levels. In addition to her significant talent, Bennett fostered other local photographers’ creativity and built community with fellow Flagstaff artists.

In 2013 John Running, Bennett’s long-time partner, donated her work to Special Collections and Archives. Approximately 150,000 color slides, black-and-white negatives/prints, and prints form the bulk of the collection.  Detailed diaries and journals provide additional contextual insight into her work and personal life.

The department envisions the exhibit as a contextual and intimate chronology of Bennett’s life through the progression of her photography. A careful balance between photographs as objects of art and as sources of meaningful context will underpin the exhibit.

Duties and Opportunities: The 2017 Reilly intern will assume primary responsibility for the virtual (web-based) exhibit.  The intern will also provide significant support for development of the physical exhibit, from its interpretive text to design and fabrication.

The internship offers the opportunity to gain practical experience in:

*Research
*Synthesis of primary and published sources
*Exhibit Planning (team-based)
*Storyline development and content interpretation
*Web page design, creation, and digital storytelling
*Public speaking (presentation to library staff upon completion of the internship)

The Reilly intern will work 40 hours per week for ten consecutive weeks.  The successful candidate will select a preferred ten-week block between May 15 – August 8, 2017.  The workweek schedule offers some flexibility.

Stipend and Housing:  $4,500 (no benefits included) total.  The Reilly intern will be paid in bi-weekly installments to reach the total of $4,500.  On-campus housing is subject to availability. For more information, please consult https://nau.edu/Residence-Life/Housing-Options/Summer-Housing/.  Renting a room in the community is also a possibility.  The successful candidate must be willing to relocate to Flagstaff for ten weeks and underwrite his or her own food, lodging, transportation to work, and parking.

Qualifications:  The preferred candidate will be a graduate student in information science or museum studies working toward a career in a library, museum, or archives setting. Graduate students should be currently part of a program with an anticipated completion date of August/September 2017 or later. Undergraduate (junior or senior) students are also encouraged to apply.

Knowledge, Skills, Abilities Required:

*Strong ability to write creatively while employing advanced research skills
*Demonstrated experience with web design
*Advanced communication skills (oral, written)
*Familiarity with video and audio software tools, HTML editing, and the Adobe Creative Suites products
*Ability to work as part of a team
*Basic experience with Microsoft Office products

Knowledge, Skills, Abilities Preferred:

*Knowledge of Colorado Plateau and Southwest history
*Understanding of photographic and print making processes
*Familiarity with archival practice

Application Deadline:  February 17, 2017.  To apply, submit the following documents to:  Peter Runge, NAU Cline Library, Box 6022, Flagstaff, AZ  86011-6022 or email Peter.Runge@nau.edu:

*Résumé or vita
*Letter of application addressing your qualifications, including hyperlinks to any previous online exhibits or products that you may have created/designed
*Copy of current transcript
*Names and contact information for three references

For more information, contact Peter Runge via email at peter.runge@nau.edu or phone at (928) 523-6502.
The mission of Cline Library’s Special Collections and Archives Department is to collect, preserve, and make available archival materials that document the history and development of the Colorado Plateau.  Interdisciplinary in nature, the collections include 7 million manuscripts, 1 million photographs, 35,000 books, 2,000 maps, and 1,300 oral histories.  Learn more at http://archive.library.nau.edu.

Flagstaff is a city of 67,000 at the base of the San Francisco Peaks surrounded by the Coconino National Forest.  Approximately 80 miles from Grand Canyon and 140 miles from Phoenix, Flagstaff enjoys a four-season climate at an elevation of 7,000 feet.  NAU has a growing and diverse student population and is a committed Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Institution and Employer of National Service.  All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply.

November 17, 2016
by special collections & archives
Comments Off on Angel Delgadillo Collection Coming to SCA

Angel Delgadillo Collection Coming to SCA

On November 11th, 2016, Kathleen Schmand, Peter Runge and Sean Evans travelled to Seligman, Arizona to partake in a celebration honoring Route 66’s 90th anniversary, and to begin a project that has been in process for nearly two years- to start bringing to Cline Library, Special Collections and Archives the Angel Delgadillo Collection.

angel           img_2653

The collection documents the Angel Delgallo family who arrived in Seligman in 1917, when the family left Mexico because of the revolution. It contains business records of Angel’s father and his pool hall and barber shop and Angel’s businesses as well. Along the way the collection also includes civic records of the city of Seligman; photos and more. The heart of the collection however, deals with Route 66. Specifically, Angel’s role in efforts to preserve and revitalize Route 66 after Seligman was bypassed by I-40 and ultimately decommissioned by the U.S. Department of Transportation in 1985.

This part of the Delgadillo collection contains correspondence between Angel and pretty much anyone he could get to listen regarding the preservation and revitalization of Route 66. Also highlighted are interviews Angel partook in (nearly 1,000) with related correspondence, and the establishment of the Historic Route 66 Association of Arizona. The Association is acknowledged as the first preservation association for Route 66 and has acted as the inspiration for virtually all other Route 66 associations in the U.S. and across the world.

We brought home to NAU the first “ceremonial” box of Delgadillo materials. Contained therein is Angel’s barber license, family and historic photographs and some unique published materials and articles on Route 66. We have a trip ahead early in December to assist the family with the wrapping up their project and to collect 6 more boxes of material, with as many as another 8-10 to follow.  The material has been housed in the family’s historic pool hall which adds a certain historic sense to the work.

img_2694

This collection will directly support research and study of Route 66 in Arizona. This collection will be used by NAU students (who have already produced three masters’ theses on Route 66 at NAU), faculty and Route 66 authors. This collection also broadly supports collections housed at other National Park Service, Research Route 66 institutions.

seligman-west-66

For more on Angel Delgadillo, check out the oral history we did with him here.

November 7, 2016
by special collections & archives
Comments Off on Victory Bell?

Victory Bell?

untitled

Inquiring minds want to know: Where is the Victory Bell?

In the image above is a small piece of NAU’s (or more properly ASC’s) campus history- the “Victory Bell”.  As the cropped piece of NAU Archive image NAU.ARC.1956-9-8  shows, here is a grainy look at the victory bell at the 50 yard line of Spillsbury Field in 1956 while the band is on the field. In searching the Pine/Lumberjack online it appears that the bell begins to get mentioned in the 1950s, and drops from mention in 1965 or so. The bell was rung at games when the Lumberjacks scored a touchdown, and generally attended to by the Chain Gang- quite a task as it appears the bell was attached to a healthy diameter log. As the keepers of campus traditions, that makes sense.

The rest of the bell information we can put forward is pure supposition. Given that we only have two images taken at a fair distance, there is little apparent detail. The bell pictured does look like a steam locomotive bell- and that makes sense inasmuch as railroads nationwide were moving to diesel-electric locomotives and scrapping their steam engines. Such bells were probably plentiful and in need of homes.

In chatting with folks locally and seeing if anyone remembered the bell, we heard few plausible and not so plausible ideas. We have heard that bell was stolen by an opposing team (as once happened to the copper ax); that it was decommissioned to Flagstaff High School and lives in a trophy case (doesn’t seem so); or that it got moved into the Dome and is lost in some little-known closet like the Ark of the Covenant at the end of Indiana Jones.

If you know anything about the Victory Bell- or have a story to share, we’d love to hear them- contact us at special.collections@nau.edu

August 30, 2016
by special collections & archives
Comments Off on Saying Goodbye to the “Fred Harvey: Branding the Southwest” Exhibit

Saying Goodbye to the “Fred Harvey: Branding the Southwest” Exhibit

This time last year, we were sweating the details on completing and putting into place what would turn out to be one of the most influential exhibits ever. “Fred Harvey: Branding the Southwest”  was built out of Cline Library, Special Collections and Archives most used collection and so it was well due the honor of being the focus of an exhibit. Our Elizabeth and P.T. Reilly intern, Ofelia Zepeda (University of Arizona, SIRLS, Knowledge River cohort member) did a magnificent job of teasing out the often complex storylines of the Fred Harvey Company’s history into very digestible parts for display in our modest exhibit space and then expanding that content for the web version of the exhibit.

Along the way across the past year we place satellite versions of the exhibit in the Flagstaff Public Library, the Flagstaff Visitors’ Center, The 1899 restaurant on campus, and in our own Scholars’ Corner Coffee shop. We did three First Friday Art Walks to celebrate the closing of the previous exhibit done around the images of Flagstaff photographer John Running, and to hint towards the Fred Harvey exhibit; the opening of the Fred Harvey Exhibit and then the celebration of the release of the Fred Harvey inspired Seven Stages beer from Mother Road Brewery. We held two exhibit openings, one for donors and one public event that also featured a great panel discussion comprised of Allen Naille, Allan Affeldt, Stephan Fried (author of Appetite for America), and Dr. Wanda Costen of NAU’s School of Hotel and Restaurant Management. We hosted a showing of Katrina Parks’ 2013 film Harvey Girls: Opportunity Bound. We hosted a variety of groups who came to tour the exhibits, plus hosted a number of NAU classes who used the exhibit as part of their class activities. We even discovered that there were what we might term Fred Harvey groupies called “Fred Heads”!

Yes, this exhibit was a lot of work for lots of people, but well worth it in the end, and it was lots of fun.

The best part of the whole process however are the great partners we worked with across this past year. They include: The Flagstaff Arts Council, Flagstaff Convention and Visitors Bureau/Flagstaff Visitors Center, Flagstaff Public Library, Grand Canyon National Parks Lodges, the Harvey Girls of Winslow, La Posada Hotel, Old Trails Museum, Mother Road Brewery, the NAU School of Hotel and Restaurant Management, and the 1899 Bar and Grill. We also received support (of many types) and encouragement from a whole host of people way too numerous to mention here (but you can see them here).

 

The exhibit will come down, quietly,  Tuesday, September 6th (early before we open…) to make way for some touch-ups before the next exhibit is put in place. Watch this space!