Special Collections and Archives blog

January 15, 2015
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Southwest Experimental Garden Array (SEGA) Internship Begins!

There’s a new face in the department – Special Collections and Archives (SCA) is happy to announce that the Dorothy T. and James J. Hanks Endowment’s “Cline Library Hanks Scholar” has begun work on this year’s repeat photography project for the department. This year’s scholar–aka “intern”–is Ms. Sarah Ciarrachi. A junior pursuing a Biology degree at NAU, Sarah has a breadth of experience that makes her a great fit for this year’s project.

Sarah posing in the John Running exhibit. #JohnRunningCline

Sarah posing in the John Running exhibit/Platt Cline chair

Some background…

The Dorothy T. and James J. Hanks Cline Library Endowment supports Northern Arizona University students for research in repeat photography. A primary goal is to locate and document camera stations of photographs held by Special Collections and Archives, with emphasis on images from the Colorado Plateau. Cline Library Hanks Scholars enhance the library’s photographic collections by increasing knowledge and discovery in the natural or social sciences. Hanks Scholars are given a unique opportunity to develop an appreciation of the value of historic photographs and repeat photography. Relatedly, SCA is the official repository for the James J. Hanks Collection.

Previous Hanks Endowment funding supported the development of the 2013-14 SCA exhibit, Time… and Time Again: A Repeat Photography Exhibit of Northern Arizona Towns and Trails. Click here to visit the virtual component of that exhibit.

Campus collaboration

In the spring of 2014, SCA approached NAU’s Dr. Tom Whitham–Principal Investigator for the Southwest Experimental Garden Array (SEGA) project–and Paul Heinrich, Data Manager and Field Engineer for SEGA, to discuss a potential partnership around a historic photomatching for their climate change project. SEGA is a new genetics-based climate change research platform that allows scientists to quantify the ecological and evolutionary responses of species exposed to changing climate conditions. SEGA has begun to create a system of 10 gardens along a steep elevation gradient in northern Arizona that includes conditions ranging from desert to alpine forest. By planting the same plant species and genotypes in different environments, scientists can identify which ones perform best and are most likely to survive changing conditions. More information about the project can be found here.

In addition to studying vegetation at different elevations, Dr. Whitham and Heinrich felt that contextualizing their work with historic images from (or as close to) these ten garden sites would reveal much about subtle changes in the flora of these elevations over time. An intern would survey existing historic holdings in SCA that would result in a selection of images in close proximity to the SEGA sites, from which more contemporary, present-day photographs could be taken from those precise historic locations. Additional images from other repositories in Arizona would be sought in the absence of images from SCA’s collections. Following the principles of repeat photography, the intern would coordinate with SEGA project personnel and supply the team with both historic images and their respective repeat photographs using the latest in DSLR camera and GPS technology. All images taken would be maintained in SCA and preserved as part of a larger set of data for the entire project.

SCA was happy to help facilitate this part of the project and saw a direct link to its Hanks Endowment opportunity. Shortly thereafter SCA began the process to find its intern/Hanks Scholar. In January of this year, this person was in place and their work began.

About Sarah

Ms. Ciarrachi has extensive experience as a trip leader and outdoor guide in northern Arizona and has been to some very remote locations across the state, including many of the SEGA sites. She has previously worked with NAU Assistant Research Professor Russell Benford to collect quantitative and qualitative ecological data at six of the ten SEGA sites. She has guided photography workshops for Arizona Highways and National Geographic Adventures and has become skilled as a photographer in her own right.

SCA looks forward to sharing more about this exciting project as it ramps up!

 

 

 

 

 

 

January 14, 2015
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The Fred Harvey exhibit (for 2015-16) begins to take form

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The library will be posting the 2015-16 Elizabeth and P.T. Reilly Internship announcement shortly (and it will be posted here when that happens) as an official kick-off to the beginning of the planning and construction of the Fred Harvey Exhibit. Internally, our discussions have focused on using the Fred Harvey Collection housed here as the foundation for a southwest-based exploration of the business, and its impacts on the region. For us in northern Arizona, the Harvey company placed some of its most impressive facilities along the Santa Fe mainline- in close proximity to Route 66. La Posada in Winslow; the Harvey facilities at Petrified Forest/Painted Desert;  the Escalante in Ash Fork; the Havasu House in Seligman; all of the Grand Canyon facilities including El Tovar, Hermits’ Rest, Desert Tower and even at in the canyon at Phantom Ranch; the La Fonda in Santa Fe; and the facilities in Albuquerque on the railroad and at the airport all helped define for rail or road travelers what the “southwest” was all about. There were “Harvey Car” “Indian Detour” trips to various reservations to be taken, layovers at quality Harvey hotels. These Harvey facilities, while perhaps aimed at the rail traveler initially, came to be part of Route 66 as well providing accommodations overnight and quality food for those traveling by car.

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Our exhibit will probably focus on the relationship between the Harvey Company and Native cultures; architecture (especially of Mary Jane Colter); the Harvey Girls (and the motion picture by the same title); the food (we have menus, recipes and more from all across the Harvey empire); but perhaps most of all, that sense of travel, adventure and tourism so well defined and shaped by the Harvey Company.

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Watch this space as we report on our progress, our intern and fun stuff we find to display along the way!

December 23, 2014
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What it was…Our Changing Local History

Crew in Front of a Pile of Lumber, Southwest Forest Industries, 1948. Photo courtesy of Fronske Studio

Crew in Front of a Pile of Lumber, Southwest Forest Industries, 1948. Photo courtesy of Fronske Studio

My family has lived and worked in Flagstaff for over 110 years, and several of which worked in the lumber industry that once fueled Flagstaff’s economy. My grandfather worked at the early days of the Arizona Lumber and Timber Company off of Milton (Mill Town) Road and my father worked at Stone Industries off of Butler Avenue. As I drive home from work each night, I frequently get nostalgic when I pass by the new Aspen Place at the Sawmill on Butler Avenue. I remember the sawmill that resided there. The mill was owned and operated by several companies during its existence, but what I recall most fondly is the smell of pine wood being milled; the stacks of smoke billowing into the air; the neat stacks of milled wood; the pile of sawdust that seemed as big as a mountain and how my neighbor, who worked at the mills, lost his life in that mountain; the horn that sounded the changing of shifts and my father getting ready for his shift; the holding pond keeping trees wet, and the to the aroma of the sawmill; and the locomotive that moved the raw trees in and milled wood out.

Arial View of Southwest Lumber Industries, 1948. Photo courtesy of Fronske Studio

Arial View of Southwest Lumber Industries, 1948. Photo courtesy of Fronske Studio

Lumber and Holding Pond, Southwest Forest Industries, 1946. Photo courtesy of Fronske Studio.

Lumber and Holding Pond, Southwest Forest Industries, 1946. Photo courtesy of Fronske Studio.

Locomotive, Southwest Forest Industries, 1985-1986. Photo courtesy of John Parsons Collection

Locomotive, Southwest Forest Industries, 1985-1986. Photo courtesy of John Parsons Collection

Flagstaff has a rich history and this is one that we pass by everyday as we go about our lives. The history of Flagstaff is steeped in the lumber and railroad industries, and fading into memory as the city grows in new directions.

I would like to share a few images and brief history of the land that was once part of the bustling lumber industry in Flagstaff. These items and others related to the lumber industry can be found on the Colorado Plateau Archives. Special Collections and Archives contains a number of collections documenting the history of the lumber industry. We have the Arizona Lumber and Timber collection, the Saginaw and Manistee Lumber/Stone Forest collection, and the Greenlaw Lumber in Clark Valley collection, the JM Dennis Lumber collection.

December 10, 2014
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Digital Exhibits Past and Present

Eighteen online exhibits reveal the richness and complexity of the Colorado plateau and related subjects through images, documents, oral histories, videos, and more.

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December 4, 2014
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Martin Litton: Ran his last rapid on November 30, 2014

Martin Litton, 1984. Photo courtesy of the PT Reilly Collection.

Martin Litton, 1984. Photo courtesy of the PT Reilly collection.

It is with great sadness that we learned of the passing of Martin Litton on November 30, 2014 at the age of 97. Martin Litton fit several lifetimes in his 97 years. He graduated from UCLA in 1938 with a degree in English and enlisted in the Navy during World War II, where he served as a pilot, flying glider planes. Following the war, he worked as a journalist for the Los Angeles Times in the 1940s and 1950s, writing on the subjects of travel and conservation.

It was through his writing on issues related to conservation at the Times that David Brower, director of the Sierra Club, first became acquainted with Martin. Brower and Litton became close friends, fellow Sierra Club members, and tireless crusaders who advocated for the protection of numerous beautiful natural resources in the United States, including the Redwood Creek (CA), Dinosaur National Park (AZ), Diablo Canyon (CA), and the Colorado River (AZ).

Martin Litton at Mile 245.2 on the Colorado River in Glen Canyon, July 13, 1962. Photo courtesy of PT Reilly collection.

Martin Litton at Mile 245.2 on the Colorado River in Glen Canyon, July 13, 1962. Photo courtesy of PT Reilly collection.

David Brower, Glen Canyon, 1962. Photo courtesy of Tad Nichols collection.

David Brower, Glen Canyon, 1962. Photo courtesy of Tad Nichols collection.

Litton, and his wife Esther, were introduced to Grand Canyon through a Colorado River trip guided by Plez Talmadge “PT” Reilly in 1955. PT Reilly was an experienced Colorado River guide and Southwest historian, who took Martin and Esther on their first river trip on the Colorado River through Glen Canyon and Grand Canyon. The experience was so profound that Martin eventually started his own river running company called Grand Canyon Dories, which used wooden boats and oars as opposed to the much more popular motorized rubber rafts. Martin founded and operated Grand Canyon Dories from 1971-1989. Martin and Esther were among the first 300 people to run the Colorado River through Grand Canyon and Martin holds the record for the oldest person to run the Colorado River at the age of 89. Martin maintained a love for and relationship with the Colorado for nearly sixties years.

PT Reilly and Martin Litton, on the Colorado River, standing in front of a dory, 1984. Photo courtesy of the PT Reilly collection.

PT Reilly and Martin Litton, on the Colorado River, standing in front of a dory, 1984. Photo courtesy of the PT Reilly collection.

Tapestry Wall, Glen Canyon, circa 1950. Photo courtesy of the Dick Sprang collection.

Tapestry Wall, Glen Canyon, circa 1950. Photo courtesy of the Dick Sprang collection.

Litton may be best known for his environmental activism. Martin is closely associated with the fight to save Glen Canyon and the failed effort to prevent the construction of Glen Canyon Dam. David Brower, Edward Abbey, Katie Lee, and Litton fought fiercely and valiantly to raise awareness of and preserve the pristine beauty of Glen Canyon that would eventually be drowned and buried by the construction of the Glen Canyon Dam. Litton and Brower wrote a wonderful piece on the tragedy in the Sierra Club Bulletin titled, “Should We also Flood the Sistine Chapel so Tourists Can Get Nearer the Ceiling?” The construction of the Glen Canyon Dam and the lost of Glen of Canyon was a painful and deep blow to Brower, Litton, Abbey, and Lee, all of whom took the loss very personally. Although the effort to save Glen Canyon was unsuccessful, Litton and Brower were able to prevent two other dams from being built on the Colorado River (Bridge Canyon Dam and Marble Canyon Dam), which would have altered the landscape and natural beauty of Grand Canyon.

Sierra Club Bulletin Decrying the Glen Canyon Dam, 1965. Photo courtesy of the PT Reilly collection.

Sierra Club Bulletin Decrying the Glen Canyon Dam, 1965. Photo courtesy of the PT Reilly collection.

Although it’s too late to thank Martin for the work he did to preserve the natural areas that many of us enjoy today, the next time you find yourself in a protected wildness area, remember Martin and the others that made that experience possible.

Martin’s archival legacy is housed at the Cline Library Special Collections and Archives. His collection reflects his activities with Grand Canyon Dories, environmental activism, and advocacy, and his personal life. The finding aid for Martin’s collection can be found here on the Arizona Archives Online. Selections from Martin’s collection, such as images, oral histories, business records, and articles can be found here on the Cline Library’s Special Collections and Archives Colorado Plateau Archives.

November 24, 2014
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The Ghosts from Exhibits Past….

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Technically, summer is over, and winter is coming. In the short span we call “fall” here, is when we change over from the past exhibit to the current one. Such change almost always makes us  here at Cline Library, Special Collections and Archives (SCA) think of exhibits past. Sometimes with fond memories!

My memory today revolves around our first “social media” experiment at promoting an exhibit- in this case the 2009 “Route 66 in Arizona: Don’t Forget Winona!” exhibit. We developed a plan to have (beyond the de rigueur exhibit web site) a blog and a Flickr page that would support the exhibit. The rationale being that we could reach out to people interested in Route 66   and promote the exhibit; and through Flickr, we could give folks a place to post photos that they felt graphically  defined Route 66 in Arizona.

Although the blog wasn’t as successful as we had hoped for as a venue for folks to discuss higher-order Route 66 topics, the Flickr site ponied up a few hundred images by the time the exhibit ended and continued to grow at a constant, if not slow pace thereafter.

Five years later, the “Route 66 in Arizona: Don’t Forget Winona!” Flickr site now has nearly 2,800 shared images, and more than 130 members with submissions arriving almost daily. In August it seemed high time to sit down and do the analysis we hoped would be possible: use the Flickr images to see what people think graphically defines Route 66 in Arizona.

Given the success of the Flickr page, we reviewed over 2,000 images for place and content, allowing for up to two “subjects” per picture. We defined 33 separate geographic locations for Route 66 in Arizona, spanning the state from end to end. “Subjects” were broken down into categories: Roadside Architecture (then further to Signs, Stores, Motels/Hotels, Restaurants, etc.), Transportation (Automobiles, Trucks, Railroads, Planes, etc.), Landscape, Roads, People, Street Scenes, Animals and Food.

The geographic results showed that while every site (or place name) had at least one image, overwhelmingly the western locations in Arizona out-numbered those from the east; and not surprisingly Seligman was the one place name with the greatest number of images – 304 out of 1,250 identifiable locations. Other popular sites included Kingman with 115 images, Williams with 100, and Holbrook with 85. The largest subject category was roadside architecture with 893 images, followed by landscapes at 197, and transportation with 132.

Within the roadside architecture subject category, signs represented the overwhelming majority with 386 images, while motels/hotels and restaurants/cafes each having 105 images contributed to the site.

Thus- signs, especially those in Seligman would seem to typify what many of our 135 photographer friends consider to be definitive of Route 66 images/iconography. I promise a more in-depth review of our data, and perhaps some commentary from our Flickr friends later this year in some semi-respectable online location. Watch this space.

Meanwhile- enjoy our online Route 66 exhibit , and view the attendant Flickr site -many of these images are simply fantastic.

Today our endeavors into “social media” continue to expand. We are contributors to Historypin, a digital, user-generated archive of historical photos, videos, audio recordings and personal recollections; we’ve contributed content from three of our collections that highlighting the Colorado River and Route 66 (http://www.historypin.com/uid53522/channels/view/53522/#!photos/list/ ).  Building on the success of social media associated with our exhibits, SCA is exploring the use of QR codes and #hashtags  with the John Running Exhibit “Offerings to the Gods of Light and Shadow“, which opened to the public on Friday, October 17, 2014.

Despite the wonderful images you can find via social media venues we contribute to and are recipients of via Flickr, please know that there are over 10 million items in the Cline Library Special Collections and Archives. We have over 2000 images from 12 different photographic collections of documenting Route 66,  the various alignments of the Mother Road from Kansas to California, from as early as the 1920s to present. View them at our digital archives, and be sure to enjoy a trip down Route 66 – or your favorite “blue highway”. Hey…and don’t forget to send  images of your travels on Route 66 to our Flickr page!

November 14, 2014
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Planning for Cold Storage

In a post to the blog earlier this summer, Special Collections and Archives shared news about a grant that Cline Library received from the National Endowment for the Humanities’ Sustaining Cultural Heritage Collections grant program.

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This two-year planning grant will provide Cline Library with a comprehensive understanding of the infrastructural, sustainability, and preservation implications when installing a large cold storage room for SCA’s rare and valuable primary source visual material (photos, films, oral history) collections. It has been determined that a colder storage environment for these materials greatly extends their integrity and longevity. While colder environments will benefit a very broad range of formats, it will particularly assist at-risk acetate negatives (including motion picture films) and color-based negatives and transparencies that will degrade and lose color much more readily at room temperature. SCA estimates that it will need a space that can accommodate approximately 2000 linear feet of material, which accounts for existing collections and future growth. Below is a map that highlights the 8,050 square feet that make up the department’s storage environment for all collections.

SCA

On November 6-7, project managers from the university’s Facilities Services unit and Cline Library staff met with the Director of the Image Permanence Institute, James Reilly. Reilly had been identified in the grant as a critical consulting voice when working with the forthcoming team of outside engineers and architects tasked with designing this space.  Reilly learned more about the project’s goals, was given a thorough tour of the entire library (including a detailed overview of the library’s mechanical systems), and provided instruction on appropriate environmental monitoring. At the end of his visit he gave the project team a debrief and provided some informal first impressions. A more comprehensive report will be made available to the library at a later date.

The NEH grant also supported the purchase of ten PEM2 Dataloggers and an associated subscription to eClimateNotebook that will enable Cline Library/SCA to better understand its internal temperature and relative humidity (RH) from year to year, particularly in relation to the exterior environment. Monitoring will be especially informative through Northern Arizona’s monsoon season (July-September), as casual monitoring thus far has intimated that the RH greatly increases when compared to the rest of the year when the environment is much dryer. Datalogger monitoring will take place throughout the duration of the grant cycle and beyond. Trends and analysis from these data will be used to help inform the necessary infrastructure requirements to sustainably maintain a responsible, long-term environment for materials requiring cold storage.

Simultaneously, a comprehensive survey of acetate degradation will be undertaken using A-D strips. These strips will be applied in a manner that will provide statistically valid data regarding the overall status of acetate degradation with materials on this format. Informally referred to as ‘vinegar syndrome,’ acetate-based negatives and motion picture films will degrade and break down, producing a familiar vinegar odor. When this phenomenon is observed, action is required – and soon. Cold storage greatly reduces the speed at which vinegar syndrome causes deterioration of these formats. In the coming days/weeks, A-D strip monitoring will occur in tandem with the PEM2 Datalogger recording as a form of both macro and micro-level environmental monitoring in the department. SCA currently undertakes a monthly monitoring activity associated with its integrated pest management program to ensure any potential insect/pest issues are quickly mitigated and/or prevented.

This project is of significant importance for Cline Library. SCA looks forward to sharing any new information with you as it becomes available.

October 29, 2014
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Halloween in the NAU Newspaper!

In the lead-up to Halloween, SCA staff thought it would be fun to highlight Halloween as articulated through NAU’s student newspaper, The Pine and The Lumberjack.  We have chosen to highlight just one issue per decade (as available), but there are over 300 individual issues of the newspaper that mention ‘Halloween’ in some capacity. Due to the hard work of many folks, the first 100 years of the student newspaper is now available (and searchable!) through the SCA site. Check out the newspaper in its entirety here.

October 29, 1935

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“Delta Psi Kappa, national physi­cal education sorority, entertained the patronesses, alumni and the women majors and minors in phy­sical education at an appropriate Founder’s day party Monday eve­ning, in Morton hall parlor. Dorothy Harrington, chaplain, assisted by the active and alumni members commemorated the found­ing of the sorority 19 years ago, in the national service. A Halloween party, with games, stunts and noisemakers followed and refreshments were served.”

   October 27, 1949

1949

“American Women Students have announced their annual Hallowe’en house party will be held Monday night, Oct. 31 at 10 p.m. This party, for women only, will be held in Morton Hall basement. Prizes will be awarded for the best disguised, the funniest, the prettiest, and the most original masqueraders.”

October 27, 1954

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“Those fanatic artists are at it again! Members of the Mu Alpha Delta, campus art club, are plan­ning the annual Halloween Ball, Friday, Oct. 29, in the women’s gymnasium at 9 p.m. Heading the decorations committee is John Davidson. He and his fellow workers have planned the traditional pallets holding can­dles for the tables, a huge mobile to hang in the center of the gym, and of course the classic versions of ghosts, goblins and jack-o-lanterns.”

October 20, 1961

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“The first annual Halloween Gymkhana will be held a week from Sunday, October 29, at the ASC Stadium Parking Lot, at 1 p.m. The Gymkhana is an automobile obstacle race sponsored by the ASC Sports Car Club. There will be three classes consisting of American Cars, Economy Compact, and Sports Cars.”

October 20, 1977

 1977

“If you happen to see some odd-looking creatures roaming around Married Housing, don’t be alarmed. They are only girls from High Rise.  Reversed trick-or-treat is the name of this residence hall project said Virginia Tooker, residence hall director of High Rise.”

October 30, 1986

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“An all campus Halloween bash at South Activity Center will kick off the festivities with dancing, a disc jockey, munchies, costume con­tests and prizes from 9 p.m. to mid­night Friday and is free for those dressed in costume. SAC, Sechrist, High Rise, Tinsley and Cowden are sponsoring the event.”

October 28, 1998

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“The other way to celebrate this Halloween is at Pandemonium at Flagstaff’s Old Post Office. Arizona’s top DJ talents include: Aud, David Skye, Alex Ruiz, DSL and Rhee will be raising hell this Saturday to a costumed crowd with the 15,000 watts of sound in the local club’s arena.”

October 24, 2001

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“If you want to see how crazy your guests can get, I suggest a good ol’ scavenger hunt. The list of items to collect could include: a set of vampire teeth, a roll of toilet paper, the head of a Barbie doll, a plastic spider, an unused pack­age of Ramen noodles (use them for brains later) and a lock of a virgin’s hair. As NAU is bordered on three sides by cemeteries, the scavenger hunt never ends until someone gets haunted, right?”

October 31, 2013

 2013

 “A student tradition, Taylor Hall’s Haunted House is ready to satisfy one’s taste for the grisly and gruesome once more. Hosted within the University Fieldhouse and put on by a team of volunteers, it features a series of rooms filled with bloodied and costumed students, some in plain sight and others hidden, ready to put on a show. Poised to jump and scream and receive the same in return from the guests passing through, playing the deranged part of some horror film escapee, this lurid assemblage of actors will be sure to provide a heavy dose of adrenaline.”

Happy Halloween from Special Collections and Archives!

October 22, 2014
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John Running Exhibit Reception

On October 17th, 2014, Special Collections and Archives fêted the opening of its latest exhibit, Offerings to the Gods of Light and Shadow: Selections from the John Running Collection. Over seventy-five attendees (friends, families, colleagues) graced the space in SCA to celebrate the life and photographic career of local photographer John Running. SCA’s very own student worker, Lara Gabrielsen, took the wonderful images you see in this post. Thanks Lara!

John Running, Cinda Nofziger, Jonathan Pringle

John Running, Elizabeth M. and P.T. Reilly Intern Cinda Nofziger, Project Manager and Curator of Visual Materials Jonathan Pringle

The festivities got started at 4 p.m. and continued until 6 p.m. In attendance were some campus media outlets, including a reporter from The Lumberjack (NAU student newspaper) and a photographer from NAU Marketing.  In addition to John’s friends, family, and colleagues, Cline Library and NAU staff/faculty were also part of the reception.

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Director of Development and Communications Kathleen Schmand and Archivist R. Sean Evans

John Running and Library Dean Cynthia Childrey

John Running and Library Dean Cynthia Childrey

Assistant Director of Development Ellen Kennedy and Assistant Dean Jill Koelling

Assistant Director of Development Ellen Kennedy and Assistant Dean Jill Koelling

Bruce Aiken, John Running

Artist Bruce Aiken and John Running

College of Arts and Letters Dean Michael Vincent and Cynthia Childrey

College of Arts and Letters Dean Michael Vincent and Cynthia Childrey

John Running, Stephen Saunders, and Corey Allen

John Running, Stephen Saunders, and Corey Allen

Cynthia Childrey and Jonathan Pringle

Cynthia Childrey and Jonathan Pringle

Head of Special Collections and Archives Peter Runge, John Running, Cynthia Childrey

Head of Special Collections and Archives Peter Runge, John Running, Cynthia Childrey

John Running and Provost Laura Huenneke

John Running and Provost Laura Huenneke

Library Specialist Sr. Cindy Summers, Building Coordinator Lauri Budzinski, and Digital Access Library Specialist, Sr. Jess Vogelsang.

Library Specialist Sr. Cindy Summers, Building Coordinator Lauri Budzinski, and Digital Access Library Specialist, Sr. Jess Vogelsang.

Tony Crum and Digital Access Librarian Todd Welch

Tony Crum and Digital Access Librarian Todd Welch

A short 20 minute presentation began once more guests arrived. Peter, Cynthia, Jonathan, Cinda, and the man of honor John Running gave a few remarks. John shared that October 17th was a significant day for his family: exactly four years ago to the day, his and Shelley’s daughter Amara became a United States citizen.

Director of Planned Giving Anne Morgan, Benita Boyd, Head of Special Collections and Archives Peter Runge, and Ellen Kennedy

Director of Planned Giving Anne Morgan, Benita Boyd, Peter Runge, and Ellen Kennedy

Shelley Claude with daughters Amara and Sophie

Shelley Claude with daughters Amara and Sophie

Shelley Claude

Shelley Claude

There were some light food selections provided for attendees from NAU catering.

Reception cake

Reception cake

Catering in the Presidents' Room

Catering in the Presidents’ Room

We had a blast helping put this exhibit together for all of you. Please come and visit us during our normal hours of operation (Monday-Thurs. 9-6, Friday 9-5) OR explore our virtual website 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Oh! And please be sure to visit Cline Library’s Facebook and Twitter pages and share comments, questions and feedback with us.

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Jonathan Pringle and Cinda Nofziger in the exhibit’s studio space – designed for taking images and sharing online using social media

October 13, 2014
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Offerings to the Gods of Light and Shadow: Selections from the John Running Collection. Exhibit Opening, October 20, 2014

Entry and title of exhibit. The image to the left is of one of John's favorite models, Bernadette and her daughters.

Entry and title of exhibit. The image to the left is of one of John’s favorite models, Bernadette Chavez and her daughters.

The Cline Library and Special Collections and Archives are excited to announce the opening of the John Running exhibit, “Offerings to the Gods of Light and Shadow: Selections from the John Running Collection,” on Monday, October 20, 2014. The exhibit is a retrospective of John Running’s 40 plus year career as a photographer and artist based in Flagstaff, Arizona.

John Running, sitting in the "studio" as the exhibit is being installed.

John Running, sitting in the “studio” as the exhibit is being installed.

Cinda Nofziger was the Elizabeth M. and P.T. Reilly Intern who curated the exhibited under the supervision of the Curator for Visual Materials, Jonathan Pringle. Cinda is a graduate student at the University of Michigan’s Information Science program.

Curator of Visual Materials and Exhibit Supervisor, Jonathan Pringle.

Curator of Visual Materials and Exhibit Supervisor, Jonathan Pringle, sitting for a portrait in the “studio”.

The exhibit highlights John’s photography career and includes selections that touch on his documentary work, portraitures, project-based photographs, and the print making process. The exhibit includes powerful and poignant images of Southwest Native Americans, the Tarahumara of northern Mexico, Palestine in the early 1990s, and several models he worked with over his career.

One compelling aspect of the exhibit is the inclusion of selections from John’s personal journals that correspond with several of the images. This “archival diptych” provides a glimpse into the artist’s mind at the time the photographs were created. It’s rare and exciting to have this type of insight into an artist’s process and life.

Pat Lauderdale, CO Bar Ranch. Photo and journal entry by John Running.

Pat Lauderdale, CO Bar Ranch. Photo and journal entry by John Running.

Social media will play an informational and fun role in the exhibit. We added QR codes to many of the images so visitors can learn more about particular images and projects. There’s also a QR code that connects with the virtual version of the exhibit. In an effort to engage visitors, we added a small, functioning  “studio” in the exhibit, where visitors can sit in one of John’s studio chairs and have their image taken. We’re asking that everyone tag their images with #JohnRunningCline. Whether you see the exhibit in person or virtually, we encourage you to “like us” (@NAUCL and @JohnRunning), “follow us” (@NAUClineLibrary and @JohnRunning), or “tag us” (#JohnRunningCline) using your favorite flavor of social media.

Social Media Handles for the Exhibit and QR Code for the Online Version of the Exhibit.

Social Media Handles for the Exhibit and QR Code for the Online Version of the Exhibit.

Links to previous posts about the John Running exhibit by Cinda Nofziger and Jonathan Pringle are available as are additional selections from the John Running collection via our digital archives.

The exhibit will be open to the public from Monday, October 20, 2014 to September 30, 2015 during Special Collections and Archives hours of operation.